myUpchar प्लस+ के साथ पूरेे परिवार के हेल्थ खर्च पर भारी बचत

What is Barbiturates (BAR) Urine test? 

Barbiturates are a group of sedative drugs that were once used to treat neurological disorders such as anxiety, seizures and insomnia. They were also the most abused in the 1960s and 70s. 

However, due to their adverse effects and risk of drug dependence, the use of barbiturates has reduced significantly. They have now been replaced by a safer class of drugs called benzodiazepines. Nonetheless, some barbiturates are still prescribed for the management of epilepsy (recurrent fits) and in anaesthesia. Also, they are one of the most commonly abused drugs.

A BAR urine test is used for checking the presence of barbiturates in the urine of a person who is suspected of drug abuse or barbiturates toxicity.

  1. Why is BAR (Barbiturates) Urine test performed?
  2. How do you prepare for BAR (Barbiturates) Urine test?
  3. How is BAR (Barbiturates) Urine test performed?
  4. How is BAR (Barbiturates) Urine test performed?
  5. What do BAR (Barbiturates) Urine test results mean?

A barbiturates urine test may be ordered for:

  • Random workplace testing
  • Return-to-duty testing
  • Post-accident testing
  • Pre-employment testing
  • Follow-up testing for drug abuse or toxicity

Your doctor may also order the test if they observe signs of drug abuse. These signs are listed as follows:

  • Paranoia (irrational suspicion or distrust)
  • Agitation
  • Panic
  • Delirium
  • Trouble breathing
  • Slurred or slowed speech
  • Small or dilated pupils
  • Fluctuations in heart rhythm and blood pressure
  • Nausea

Though barbiturates show up in both urine or blood, a urine test is noninvasive and much easier to perform. Also, barbiturates can be detected for much longer in the urine - up to two to four hours of intake until one to three weeks after use. While it can only be found for up to 52 hours of intake in the blood.

You do not require much preparation before this test. Let the doctor know if you are taking any prescription or non-prescription drugs or supplements. This is because some of the medicines and supplements may interfere with the testing protocol and give false-positive results.

Your doctor or nurse will first explain the test and the procedure to you. A person from the same gender may be assigned to you so you don’t tamper with the sample. The following steps are typically followed:

  • First, make sure your hands are washed and clean
  • Now, clean your genital area to make sure that you get a clean sample. For the same reason, it is recommended that you first start urinating into the toilet bowl and then collect the rest of the urine into the given container 
  • Return the filled container to the facility as soon as possible

Your doctor or nurse will first explain the test and the procedure to you. A person from the same gender may be assigned to you so you don’t tamper with the sample. The following steps are typically followed:

  • First, make sure your hands are washed and clean
  • Now, clean your genital area to make sure that you get a clean sample. For the same reason, it is recommended that you first start urinating into the toilet bowl and then collect the rest of the urine into the given container 
  • Return the filled container to the facility as soon as possible

Normal results:

A normal result in the BAR test is generally reported as negative. This means that there are no barbiturates found in your urine sample or the amount found was below the cut-off value - the threshold value for a drug in the body. The cut-off value for all formulations of barbiturates in the urine is 100ng/ml - values below the cut off range are considered normal. 

Abnormal results:

An abnormal result in the BAR test is reported as positive. This means that the sample you submitted has higher than normal barbiturate levels. Depending on the amount detected, your doctor will decide if it is caused by the intake of certain medicines and if the levels are considered toxic. Usually, a value above 200 ng/mL is an indicator of the use of one of the formulations of barbiturates.

An abnormal result does not always mean drug usage; it could be a false-positive result. False-positive results can be due to cold and cough medicines, antibiotic therapy or ibuprofen intake. Please speak to your doctor to know the precise implications of your results.

Disclaimer: All results must be clinically correlated with the patient’s complaints to make a complete and accurate diagnosis. The above information is provided from a purely educational point of view and is in no way a substitute for medical advice by a qualified doctor.

और पढ़ें ...

References

  1. European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction [Internet]. European Union. Lisbon. Portugal. Europe. Barbiturates drug profile
  2. National Institute of Drug Abuse. National Institute of Health [internet]. U.K. Drug Testing
  3. MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: US National Library of Medicine; Drug Testing
  4. Michigan Medicine: University of Michigan [internet]; Toxicology Tests
  5. Wilson D, Manual of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests, 2008. The Mc Graw Hills companies Inc., Pp:560.
  6. Disposition of Toxic Drugs and Chemicals in Man. 10th edition. Edited by RC Baselt. Foster City, CA: Biomedical Publications, 2014.
  7. Langman LJ et al: Clinical Toxicology. In: Tietz Textbook of Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics. Edited by N Rifai, AR Horvath, CT Wittwer. Sixth edition. St. Louis, MO. Elsevier, 2018, pp 832-887.